MAN MADE WATERWAYS - ANCIENT MOUND BUILDERS
CANAL SYSTEM INTERLINKING LAKES AND RIVERS FOR TRANSPORT

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The ancient people not  only had developed a great urban civilization based upon
an agrarian economy but constructed  the ingenious system of interlocking canals
. With amazing skill,
the engineers developed an internal system of navigation, linking the lakes and rivers with the various metropolitan centers
of the region, and it was by means of these interconnecting waterways that the cities received the needed produce. The
Mississippi River served as the principal transportation artery. Dr. G.C. Swallow, in referring to one of these canals, said,
"One of them, that I examined, measured 53 feet wide and was 14 feet deep."  More of these canal  system was created
interlinking water routes from the Great Lakes. Many archaeologists and investigators say that the 'artificial' rivers in the
southern part of the United States are a gift handed down by this mysterious race.

I
n all the areas where the mounds and pyramids are located, there were NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL LAKES. It is interesting
to note that the Aztecs ALSO chose to dwell near lakes. Right on the shores of these lakes in the Mississippi Valley the
natives constructed their vast cities. "The cities were circular in shape and surrounded by walls. Behind the wall they carved
out a large CANAL to enable the waters of the lake or river to enter. These canals provided them with an inexhaustible
supply of fresh water and, in addition, made it possible for them to maintain a year-round supply of live fish" (ibid., p.54).

The canals also provided transportation.

This type of city is found mainly in the counties of southeast Missouri. Even today, near the city of New Madrid, one can find
ruins of a city that extended over an area of several square miles -- all enclosed within a wall! The remains of numerous
mounds and dwelling-places remain to this day.

The people who lived in this and other cities of the region constructed the mounds, the pyramids, the walls and the canals.
This kind of construction served two main purposes: it drained swampy areas and made possible the irrigation of dry areas.
The engineers who designed and built the great pyramids of the Mississippi Valley would have little trouble designing and
constructing the network of canals. Conant, in his previously quoted work, points out --

The prehistoric people of Missouri not only had developed a great urban civilization based upon an agrarian economy but
also constructed giant edifices of earth and stone. This same race was also capable of constructing the ingenious system of
interlocking canals. With amazing skill, the engineers developed an internal system of navigation, linking the lakes and rivers
with the various metropolitan centers of the region, and it was by means of these interconnecting waterways that the cities
received the needed produce. The Mississippi River served as the principal transportation artery. Dr. G.C. Swallow, in
referring to one of these canals, said, "One of them, that I examined, measured 53 feet wide and was 14 feet deep." For a
more adequate description of this type of construction, the reader is referred to Mr. George W. Carleton of Gayoso,
Missouri, who wrote the following:

"In addition to our mounds, we can be proud of these ancient canals. Col. Juan H. Walker informed me that before the
earthquakes [1812?], these canals -- we would call them little canals today -- clearly demonstrated their artificial origin.
Since the area has again been inhabited, the land stripped of trees, and the ground cleared, we are able to see what the
first inhabitants of the region constructed. One of the canals lies to the east of the little town of Gayoso. It now connects
Great Lake with the Mississippi River. Beyond is the Pemiscot Canal. This canal unites the waters from Lake Pemiscot with
Grand Lake. Another watercourse, or artificial canal, is known today as the Cypress Bend Canal. Col. Walker said that it was
built to connect the waters of Cushion Lake with a canal that flows into Grand Lake. Lake Cushion is located to the north of
Pemiscot County. By means of this network of canals, lakes and interconnecting canals, the inhabitants of this region
possessed an interior navigation system from the Mississippi River to Gayoso via Great Lake and Lake Cushion and
another canal to Lake Collins; from there, by means of other connecting canals, it continued to the east where it flowed into
the Mississippi River, about six miles downriver from New Madrid." -- Pp. 77-78.

Many archaeologists and investigators say that the artificial rivers in the southern part of the United States are a gift handed
down by the pre-Columbian Indians of this region!

The early explorers who came upon these ancient cities with their mounds and intricate system of interlocking canals were
astounded by their unexpected discovery, and they raised two very important questions -- WHY did the inhabitants abandon
these great cities? and WHERE did they go?

What makes the Mound-builder phenomenon so unique to archaeologists is the fact that there is NO SINGLE EVENT in
terms of climate change that could have prompted such a mass exodus from a well entrenched way of life. Their art,
agriculture, housing, forms of government, religion --the whole shebang -- just disappeared!  Could it have been a hit by
comet?

Mound Builders Continued
Comet Hit Great Lakes Region, Fragment Human Populations, 12,900 Years Ago
ScienceDaily (May 23, 2007)

Two University of Oregon researchers are on a multi-institutional 26-member team proposing a startling new theory: that an
extraterrestrial impact, possibly a comet, set off a 1,000-year-long cold spell and wiped out or fragmented the prehistoric
people and a variety of animal genera across North America almost 13,000 years ago.

Researchers propose that a known reversal in the world's ocean currents and associated rapid global cooling, which some
scientists blame for the extinction of multiple species of animals and the end of the Clovis Period, was itself the result of a
bigger event. While generally accepted theory says glacial melting from the North American interior caused the shift in
currents, the new proposal points to a large extraterrestrial object exploding above or even into the Laurentide Ice Sheet
north of the Great Lakes.

"Highest concentrations of extraterrestrial impact materials occur in the Great Lakes area and spread out from there,"
Kennett said. "It would have had major effects on humans. Immediate effects would have been in the North and East,
producing shockwaves, heat, flooding, wildfires, and a reduction and fragmentation of the human population."

The carbon-rich layer contains metallic microspherules, iridium, carbon spherules, fullerenes, charcoal and soot. Some of
those ingredients were found worldwide in soils dating to the K-T Boundary of 65 million years ago.

The K-T layer marks the end of the Cretaceous Period and the beginning of the Tertiary Period, when numerous species
were wiped out after a massive asteroid is believed to have struck Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and the Gulf of Mexico.

Missing in the new theory is a crater marking an impact, but researchers argue that a strike above or into the Laurentide ice
sheet could have absorbed it since it was less intense than the K-T event.
Artist's concept of comet. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Comet Hits Great Lake Region
Ancient Waterways built by Mound Builders
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